Posts in History
The Body is a Blade

There’s a specific era of girlhood, in my experience, in which one might halfheartedly do this kind of thing: gymnastics, figure skating, dance lessons. There’s a phase of life defined, in part, by being awakened to the idea that such traditionally feminine endeavors are romantic, not just because they look beautiful,  but because they require so much of you, as a person and a body. Girls learn early on the romance of practicing severe self-discipline, of denying yourself things: free time, food, pleasure.

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The Normal Girl of Jane Austen: How the Lens of Irony and Judgement Showed Me Women Can Be Emotional and Strong

Austen often utilizes ironic literary techniques to perform radical evocation, but to me, I like the simplicity you get from reading Anne’s character. She narrates through thought before action, and doesn’t stray from being honest:she acknowledges that shit sucks sometimes.

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How the Baroque Movement Revolutionized My Ideal Form of Feminism and Female Sexuality

The sense that Baroque art gives you is the sense of reaffirmation, that you somehow relate to the drama presented in mythological allusions. That the light and the dark can intertwine so perfectly, and that consistency might not be your strong suit and that is okay. 

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The Life and Liberation of Lingerie: The Evolution of Intimate Apparel and the Ways Women Have Shaped It

Just like anything else, fashion and culture happen in cycles. By the 1950s, sexy had morphed into the curve-crazed idolization of the pin-up girl – sporting form-fitting, hourglass styles of clothing reminiscent of the corset. Only this time, the garments were meant to be seen.

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